products-saeboflexThe SaeboFlex allows individuals suffering from neurological impairments such as stroke the ability to incorporate their hand functionally in therapy and at home by supporting the weakened wrist, hand, and fingers.

products-saeboreachThe SaeboReach not only incorporates the affected wrist and hand but also the elbow. The orthosis consists of the SaeboFlex and an above-elbow component.

products-saebostretchThe SaeboStretch® uses a revolutionary stretch technology, which allows the fingers to move through flexion caused by associated reactions and tone.

While it will involve some practice and a few adaptive tools, cooking one-handed after stroke is possible.

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Tips for One-Handed Cooking After Stroke

While many stroke survivors are able to overcome weakness on one side of the body through task-oriented practice and hard work with a therapist, it is important for them to learn new ways of doing things while they work on rebuilding their strength.

After a stroke, many survivors find themselves either weakened or paralyzed on one side of their bodies. They may also experience  spasticity in their limbs, which makes muscles tight and stiff, restricting movement. Having stiff muscles and limited or no movement on one side of the body makes everyday life a lot more challenging. Imagine going about your morning routine with one hand tied behind your back. You would have to find new ways to do the things that you used to do every day without thinking about them.

Cooking can be difficult even when you have two hands. It involves a lot of prep, working with a variety of tools, and handling sharp or hot objects that can be dangerous. However, being able to cook for themselves allows stroke survivors to become more self reliant and save money buying expensive pre-made food or take out. While it will involve some practice and a few adaptive tools, cooking one-handed after stroke is possible.

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One-Handed Cooking Tips

Master the Basics

When you’re first learning how to cook with one hand, take time to master a few basic skills before you jump into trying a more complicated recipe. You should practice skills like peeling vegetables (with the help of some adaptive equipment) and spreading butter on toast.

Do Your Prep First

When you’re ready to take on your first recipe, do all of your prep work before you start cooking. This includes gathering all the utensils and ingredients you’ll need, as well as chopping any produce you might need.

Make Friends with Your Oven

It is not safe to attempt to move a big pot with one hand. As long as you don’t make the pan too heavy, you should be able to use your unaffected hand to safely transport food in and out of the oven.

Ask For Help When You Need It

If you are struggling to complete a task in the kitchen, never be afraid to ask for help. Ask a loved one to help you chop or peel difficult produce and keep it in your fridge for later. Most people are happy to help—you just need to ask!

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